2019 Student Research Conference:
32nd Annual Student Research Conference

Political Ideology and the Consumption and Perceived Credibility of News Outlets


Kelly M. Dobbs*, Ramey D. Hoehn, and Rebecca K. MacMillan
Dr. Amanda Medlock-Klyukovski, Faculty Mentor

Our research examined the relationship between political ideology and the perceived credibility of four news outlets of different political leanings, as well as the relationship between ideology and the frequency of consumption of nine news sources. The study was conducted through an online survey of university students following the 2016 general election. Our research revealed that those with more liberal ideologies are more likely to use liberal news outlets, such as NPR and The New York Times, and find them more credible than conservative media. Similarly, those with more conservative ideologies are more likely to use conservative news outlets, including Fox News and conservative online news sources, and find them more credible. Our research revealed that there is a direct correlation between political ideology and the perceived credibility of news outlets, as well as a direct correlation between political ideology and the frequency of use of different news outlets.

Keywords: Media Bias, Political Ideology, News, Selective Exposure, News Outlets, Bias, Credibility , Media

Topic(s):Communication

Presentation Type: Oral Paper

Session: 308-3
Location: VH 1010
Time: 1:30

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